Lord flies essay

Castle Rock will become Jack's "headquarters" and is significantly different from the lush vegetation found elsewhere on the island. Whilst he and Ralph are searching for the "beast" they come across it and Jack recognizes it as a perfect place for "a fort."(ch 6) It is a "table rock," set marginally apart from the main part of the island. The steep slope and the "pink, tumbled boulders" excite Jack and with just a minimal trickle of fresh water, he is impressed, especially as the boys roll rocks down the steep sides- perfect for keeping the enemy out. Ralph has a different opinion of this "rotten place." 

If someone believes that another is superior, usually in strength and intelligence, they will be a follower of that person and indulge in their wishes. At first in the novel, Ralph was elected chief, the most superior position. Everyone followed Ralph's demands because he was the superior. Ralph was Jack's superior, but Jack was still in charge of the members of his former choir. Jack did not believe that Ralph was his superior in strength or intelligence. He left with choir, who followed him. The others soon came to believe that Jack was superior to Ralph because he could hunt and supply them with food. They of course went and became a part of Jack's tribe, and indulged in his wishes. This all shows that people are easily awed by a show of superior ability and will readily follow anyone that they believe to be superior.

At the end of Lord of the Flies , Ralph weeps "for the end of innocence," a lament that retroactively makes explicit one of the novel's major concerns, namely, the loss of innocence. When the boys are first deserted on the island, they behave like children, alternating between enjoying their freedom and expressing profound homesickness and fear. By the end of the novel, however, they mirror the warlike behavior of the adults of the Home Counties: they attack, torture, and even murder one another without hesitation or regret. The loss of the boys' innocence on the island runs parallel to, and informs their descent into savagery, and it recalls the Bible's narrative of the Fall of Man from paradise.

Answer: Jack exploits the boys' fear of the beast to usurp leadership from Ralph, who stresses a rational approach to the presumed evil presence on the island. Within Jack's tribe, the beast continues to have a powerful symbolic and political significance among the boys, uniting them and ensuring their loyalty to Jack's leadership. When Jack first attempts to break away from Ralph's tribe, his authority is not recognized, but as the boys' fear of the beast increases, an increasing number defect from Ralph's group to Jack's, where the existence of the beast is not only acknowledged but is a central fact of day-to-day life.

Lord flies essay

lord flies essay

Answer: Jack exploits the boys' fear of the beast to usurp leadership from Ralph, who stresses a rational approach to the presumed evil presence on the island. Within Jack's tribe, the beast continues to have a powerful symbolic and political significance among the boys, uniting them and ensuring their loyalty to Jack's leadership. When Jack first attempts to break away from Ralph's tribe, his authority is not recognized, but as the boys' fear of the beast increases, an increasing number defect from Ralph's group to Jack's, where the existence of the beast is not only acknowledged but is a central fact of day-to-day life.

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